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In Power to the Public, Tara Dawson McGuinness and Hana Schank make the case for renovating government and policymaking with 21st-century digital technology.
 
Review by Jim Fruchterman
 
The global COVID-19 pandemic brought into stark relief the differences between the haves and the have-nots. The divide is especially apparent when it comes to technology. Lack of devices and connectivity limited the access of low-income communities to education and health care. Many nonprofits without tech capacity failed to transition to online programming when in-person activities were suspended due to lockdown orders. State and federal governments struggled with policy responses, hobbled by a lack of detailed information about the health, economic, and social consequences of COVID-19 on people in need. Well-off individuals prospered while lower-income individuals became even poorer and suffered a disproportionate number of COVID-related deaths and disabilities. The debacle raises this question: Is it possible to use technology to reverse these trends rather than accelerate them?
 
In Power to the Public: The Promise of Public Interest Technology, New America’s Tara Dawson McGuinness and Hana Schank put forth a vision of government programs and policymaking based in modern digital technology. Their objective is no less than the creation of a new field of practice, public interest technology, which they define as “the application of design, data, and delivery to advance the public interest and promote the public good in the digital age.”
 
The authors come to this topic with deep experience in government’s use of technology. McGuinness, the director of New America’s New Practice Lab, was intimately involved in the central tragedy/redemption episode of GovTech: the disastrous launch of HealthCare.gov during the Obama administration and its famed rescue by a team of Silicon Valley technologists. Schank, New America’s strategy director for public interest technology, comes from a long career in consulting and tech; she was an early hire at the US Digital Service the entity born from the HealthCare.gov fiasco to recruit technologists to find solutions for the country’s most important problems. McGuinness and Schank’s collective experience with technology done both right and wrong inspired this book’s argument for overhauling how government agencies use software and data to better serve citizens.

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WOMEN’S  MONTH SPECIAL EDITION - ARTICLES ON WOMEN:

#WomensMonth: The power of a story - leading us to change 

The topic of gender equality in the workplace is not new. All too often, headlines today call out yet another woman who has spoken out against the injustices she has experienced because of her gender. If anything, this proves that today, gender inequality is still very much alive and well in the workplace.
 
We see these inequalities show up in other areas the gender pay gap, cases of sexual harassment and issues with the lack of women represented at senior management levels, to name a few.

Despite these challenges, I believe that as women, we have taken a crucial step forward in the fight for gender equality. Today, women are significantly more vocal than we have been in the recent past, boldly, and unashamedly sharing our stories of discrimination. Be it in a public social media post that goes viral or even just amongst our immediate colleagues, women are speaking up more and calling out the injustices of gender inequality and rightfully demanding reform.
 
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Read the e-newsletter here: Issue 766: Tech for the Public Good

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