policing

SA Criticises HRW Report on Policing

The Ministry of Police says the Human Rights Watch's (HRW) 2014 World Report is ‘generalising and subjective’ in its assessment of the police.

In the report, HRW says: "Serious concerns remain about the ongoing conduct and capacity of the South African Police Service, both in terms of the use of force in general, as well as the ability to deal with riots in a rights-respecting manner."

ZHRC Slam 'Violent' Police Crackdown

Zimbabwe's Human Rights Commission (ZHRC) has accused the police of brutality and violating the rights of protesters when clamping down on anti-government demonstrations in the last two months.

Political tension is rising in the southern African nation, where public anger at the dire state of the economy, in particular an 80 percent jobless rate, cash shortages and delays in salaries for public workers, has spilled onto the streets.

​Police Arrest Man With 36 SASSA Cards

Police seized 36 pension cards and an undisclosed sum of money from a 25-year-old man during a sting operation in Durban.

Police spokesman Lieutenant-Colonel, Shooz Magudulela, says the Umlazi K9 Unit received information about ‘fraudulent activities’ at a service station in Amanzimtoti‚ south of the city.

The team found the man at an ATM‚ withdrawing cash‚ with 36 South African Social Security Agency cards in his possession‚ with pin codes written on them.

SAHRC Slams Police Brutality

The South African Human Rights Commission (SAHRC) says that police brutality is a serious problem in the country and the actions of the police officers allegedly involved in the killing of crime suspect Khulekani Mpanza in Krugersdorp two weeks ago highlights the long-term nature of this scourge.

Expressing its concern over yet another video depicting police brutality and human rights violations‚ the SAHRC warned that the Constitution protects the rights of every person‚ including criminal suspects who were presumed innocent until proven otherwise in a fair trial.

SAHRC Criticises Police Over Mpanza Killing

The South African Human Rights Commission (SAHRC) has condemned the lethal shooting by police of a robbery suspect in Krugersdorp‚ saying the “unnecessary death opened again the raw debate on policing and crime”.

SAHRC spokesperson, Isaac Mangena, in a press statement, states that, “It with the greatest concern that the SAHRC observes yet another video on police brutality and human rights violations.”

SAHRC Condemns Police Killings

The South African Human Rights Commission (SAHRC) condemns the wave of lawlessness that our country is experiencing at so many levels.

The SAHRC says that policing is a dangerous job‚ “but there is no justification that their service to the people of South Africa should lead to their untimely deaths.”

Spokesperson, Isaac Mangena, points out that, “The SAHRC wishes to reinforce the constitutional idea that human rights‚ and in this situation particularly‚ the right to life and dignity‚ is for all in South Africa‚ including police officers.”

The Unlawful Suspension of the National Head of the Hawks

On 23 January 2015, the judgment was handed down in the Pretoria High Court by Prinsloo J following an urgent application brought by the Helen Suzman Foundation (HSF) in the wake of the suspension of the National Head of the Directorate of Priority Crimes Investigation (‘the National Head’) (‘Hawks’). The HSF is of the view that this suspension is irregular, and that the Minister of Police (‘Minister’) had acted unlawfully.

Background

Does South Africa's Criminal Justice System Deter Offenders?

Conventional wisdom holds that the threat of harsh punishment acts as a deterrent against crime. This view is based on the assumption that criminals weigh the potential benefit of committing a crime against the potential cost of being caught and punished. This theory of criminal behaviour has largely been discredited, because in the real world criminals often think that they will not get caught. Nevertheless, the view persists.

Govt Warned on ‘Single Police Force’

The Institute for Security Studies (ISS) has warned that local policing will suffer if a proposal to form a single police force is approved and becomes law.
ISS senior researcher, Johan Burger, points out that it is clear the African National Congress felt ‘uncomfortable and threatened’ by the idea that provinces and municipalities not under their political control could exert control over armed forces.

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