learning

Learners Prefer English at Schools – NGO

The South Africa Institute of Race Relations (SAIRR) says that more than 60 percent of South African pupils choose English for learning and teaching.

SAIRR researcher, Jonathan Snyman, points out that, "The majority of pupils are taught in African languages at the foundation phase, but switch to either English or Afrikaans as their language of learning and teaching from as early as Grade Four."

The Institute states that this is despite the fact that only seven percent of the country's pupils (852 000 out of 12.2 million) spoke English at home.

Fellowship Targets Young Learners

The Allan Gray Orbis Foundation is offering South Africa’s brightest young minds a head-start in life through its Allan Gray Fellowship Programme.

The initiative aims to develop students, known as Allan Gray Fellows, into SA’s future high growth entrepreneurial leaders and includes comprehensive financial support as one of its benefits.

Parents Urged to Get More Involved

President Jacob Zuma has urged parents to be more involved in the education of their children instead of relying on teachers so much.

Delivering a lecture in Sasolburg in honour of John Dube, the African National Congress’s first president, Zuma argued that poor education is one of the causes of moral decay and slow economic growth.

"We, in our own homes, we no longer educate our kids … parents are not doing it. Parents are leaving it all to the teachers. That’s wrong," he explained.

SA Criticised Over Education Standards

Founder and benefactor of the Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy for Girls, Oprah Winfrey, says the standard of school education in South Africa is too low.

Winfrey emphasises that South Africa had to invest in leadership so that rewards could be reaped later, especially in poor communities.

She points out that her school’s success is due to good, knowledgeable teachers and to girls who were not pampered because they came from difficult backgrounds.

Govt to Transform FET Colleges

The Minister of Higher Education and Training, Blade Nzimande, says that South Africa’s beleaguered Further Education and Training (FET) colleges should prepare for a dramatic shake-up to address the country’s dire skills shortages.

Nzimande says that his department envision a complete transformation of South Africa’s higher education system, currently characterised by enrolment rates at universities that are almost three times as high as those at colleges.

Education Plan to Help SA Reach Job Targets

The green paper for post-school education launched this week offers a refreshingly frank analysis of how South Africa’s post-school education system should be aligned to the needs of society and the economy.

Should the objectives of the green paper be met, by 2030 university enrolment will double to 1.5 million, and that of further education and training (FET) colleges will register a six-fold increase to four million.

Centralised Application System Works – Khan

Durban University of Technology says the centralised application system introduced in 1999 has ‘been phenomenal’ in helping KwaZulu-Natal universities manage late applications.

Durban University of Technology’s senior director of corporate affairs, Alan Khan, points out that in that province, prospective students apply to the Central Applications Office.

He states that the university then accept a certain number of students, who are invited to register in January.

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