Governance and Democracy

Schooling Muslims in Natal: Identity, State and the Orient Islamic Educational Institute

The history of Muslim education in the east coast region of South Africa is the story of ongoing struggles by an immigrant religious minority under successive, exclusionary forms of state. ‘Schooling Muslims in Natal’ traces the labours and fortunes of a set of progressive idealists who, mobilising merchant capital, transoceanic networks and informal political influence, established the Orient Islamic Educational Institute in 1943 to found schools and promote a curriculum inclusive of secular subjects and Islamic teaching.

Youth Dialogue

Organisation of African Youth (OAYouth) was formed in 2009, conforming to the provisions of African Youth Charter, which was adopted by the African Union. The Charter defines African youth as people between the ages of 15 and 35. Membership to OAYouth is open to individuals and youth organisations, that are working to empower youth on any issues.

Transformative Leaders Must Recognise LGBTI Rights

The acceptance of lesbian, bisexual, gay, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) people in Africa is a battle that is yet to be won. Sexual orientation and gender identity are integral aspects of an evolving society. In conservative societies where LGBTI's face discrimination, political and traditional leaders must lead in the discussions towards the acceptance of sexual minorities.

This follows the recent homophobic comments made by King Goodwill Zwelithini of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

Department Drops Plan to Dismiss DG

The Department of Communications has withdrawn a letter of dismissal against his director-general, Mamodupi Mohlala.

Mohlala was fired by Communications Minister, Siphiwe Nyanda last month, saying there had been an irretrievable breakdown of trust between them.

Mohlala challenged her dismissal in court, arguing that Nyanda did not have the authority to fire her.

The Politics of Decentralisation and Donor Funding in South Africa’s Rural Water Sector

Extract from the Paper

Decentralisation is an inherently political process. Political and socio-economic actors favour it because it is seen to advance their interests. But the interests of the various social groups in society differ quite dramatically. Societal interest groups concerned with poverty and economic inequalities advocate decentralisation because it is seen to bring development closer to the people, promote participatory approaches, and consolidate democracy.

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